Our lives, Our Tales: Documenting Early Queer Activism in India

Our lives, Our Tales: Documenting Early Queer Activism in India

Our history and our vision from our eyes.


I Can Be Anything

I Can Be Anything

We are nothing but ‘A Speck of Cosmos’ what I believe. More often, we belong to moments that we create. It is said that we are made up of five elements or adding a biological lens makes it to flesh and blood. Thus, this testifies that we are just random masses. But unfortunately at birth, we are distinguished against our will and are assigned a codified norm of society called ‘Gender’. It is completely a social construct rather than a biological one. I wonder why things are made so complicated? Because it’s very simple at its core that one day, we all have to merge again into this Universe irrespective of our gender. Ain’t that makes us mere dust particles?


Anxiety of Coming Out

Anxiety of Coming Out

Queer people often fear rejection and non-acceptance on coming out. Coming out means opening up with your close vulnerabilities. Feel the jitters and anxiety of coming out


Embrace of Tears

Embrace of Tears

To alleviate the pain through shared vulnerabilities.


Our lives, Our Tales: Documenting Early Queer Activism in India

Our lives, Our Tales: Documenting Early Queer Activism in India

Nazariya organized two events to document the oral history of early queer activism in India, particularly focused on New Delhi. The aim of this series was to archive earlier struggles for LGBT rights in the country which have been marginalized over time because of the increasing focus on Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) which criminalizes ‘sex against the order of nature.’ Over time, they realized that there is a need to talk about queer activism of the 90s and 2000s which was not directly associated with the Law, especially around the issues of queer women.


Holding Indigenity: Creating inclusive spaces for Indigenous people

Holding Indigenity: Creating inclusive spaces for Indigenous people

Rituparna Bohra shares her fresh and honest take on how to create inclusive spaces for indigenous people in work and movements.


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